How Brutalist web design challenges the norms of conventional web design

If you remember our Ten Web Design and Development Fails blog post, our last paragraph mentioned Ling Valentine’s Ling’s Car Hire website. We said how it had broken many web design rules, yet worked very well. In another source, we found how the Ling’s Car Hire website exemplified Brutalist Web Design par excellence. In Motherboard’s review of the website, Ling said on usability:

“The “secret” of web design/good UX, is to be human. And truthful and honest, and not force it and stop manipulating people. It really helps if you address your demographic, for example choose emotional music from the correct era… and add a bit of humour. But people know when things are honest, they can feel it.”

Mr Valentine places human contact and resonance above swish design. He is not too snobbish about clean backgrounds and the right gradients. Just a case of what he thinks works best. If he fancies plonking a kitten on a certain page, that’s his prerogative.

Brutalist web design breaks the established norms of contemporary website design, user interfaces, and responsive web design. In one way, it could be a more human approach to web design. On the other hand, it could be an ironic euphemism or catch all term to justify bad design.

Perhaps there is a good case for brutalist web design. Is Punk Web Design a more appropriate term? Maybe so, given how the user interface of some sites are reminiscent of punk fanzines like Sniffin’ Glue. It also gives us a nostalgic feel for the era of Geocities websites and rotating ‘e’ icons for sending emails.

Over the last year, brutalist web design has made the design magazines and newspapers due to its break from the established order. We are unsure: we favour slickly produced websites that are easy on the eye and quick to load. Whether your desired design is brutalist, high gloss, or steampunk, we at Dreamkatcha will do our utmost to build a website that best reflects your business.

Dreamkatcha, 18 May 2017.